FAQ

/FAQ
FAQ 2017-03-03T21:59:58+00:00

CyberLocks

Yes, the electronics are sealed, for installation indoors and out. CyberLock cylinders are designed to operate in a variety of environments. Click here for more information on operating CyberLock cylinders in cold weather environments.
No, CyberLock cylinders have no keyway and cannot be picked like a mechanical lock. CyberLock cylinders resist forced rotation and, if tampered with, are designed to remain in the locked position.
CyberLock cylinders are most commonly programmed with the Grand Master CyberKey. CyberKey smart keys “carry” lock data back to the software through Authorisers.
No, with CyberLock the need to re-key is eliminated. Locks can be “electronically re-keyed” in the field to provide immediate response to lost/stolen keys. For additional security, keys can be set to expire regularly, limiting exposure of a lost key.
It is very possible that the lock you need is already part of the CyberLock portfolio. To determine which lock is best for you, click here to view our lock specifications or contact us today.

CyberKeys

In less than a second, the lock and key synchronize: they exchange unique IDs, compare access codes, validate the list of authorized locks, confirm the current time is within the authorized window, and ensure the key is not on the lock’s list of lost keys. If everything is validated, the lock will open.
There are two ways to manage lost keys: proactively and reactively. When programmed, keys can be set to expire. These expirations are flexible and can be set according to specific security requirements: hourly, daily, weekly, or monthly expirations are common examples. When a key with a near-term expiration is lost, no action may be required. When a key with a long-term expiration is lost, creating unacceptable risk exposure, vulnerable locks can be reprogrammed in order to load the lost key ID into the lock memory and prevent that key from working.
If programmed as a standard user key, it can access up to 3300 locks. If programmed as a master key, it can access all of the locks in the database.
Low battery warnings are provided in the software every time a CyberKey is updated via a communication device and in the key itself, through an audio or visual indicator. Visit our Technical Documents page to learn more about CyberKey low battery indicators.
The key permissions, access schedules, and audit trail are maintained even if the battery dies but the clock inside the key may need to be reset. This can be done by updating the key right after recharging or replacing the key battery.
Keys are updated and programmed via communication devices. When a CyberKey and a communicator make contact, the audit trail is downloaded from the key while simultaneously new schedules, permissions, and system information are uploaded to the key. Communication devices are linked to software over a local area network or securely over the Internet.